Thrasher

Taxonomic Class: Aves.
Location: Ebullus Putredinis.
Habitat: Tropical rainforest.
Size: Two to four meters tall, wingspans of three to five meters.
Diet: Carnivorous. As a solitary hunter, an adult thrasher can easily bring down a 200 kg boar. They have also been observed to work in groups to hunt animals as large as gomfos.

The indigenous Putred name for the thrasher, tuldekker, can be roughly translated as “sky-demon.” For centuries, the Putred tribes battled against the thrashers, never doing more than to keep their numbers in check. With their world’s connection to the greater ebullum in 1895, the foremost Putred tribe, the Trulawesi gained access to gunpowder and advanced artillery. They used these weapons to wage a full out war against the trashers. While thrasher numbers plummeted during the initial onslaught, the thrashers apparently banded together to defend their territory. By 1902 the entire Trulawesi population had been eradicated.

From The Cordelian Chronicles:

Three more creatures materialized from a bluish haze in the air above them. They seemed colossal to the girls as they plummeted, but merely gigantic as they landed and tucked in their wings. They were like enormous ostriches, nine feet tall, but with larger heads that had larger (and sharper) beaks. Their powerful legs were covered with yellowish down, but no one noticed, because the legs were already fiercely kicking. And while an ostrich’s wings tend towards non-existent, the wingspans of these birds stretched fifteen feet. The wings were thin, but flexible, so that they could slash with the razor-sharp edges that graced their wingtips.

“Thrashers!” Sierra yelled. “Get in the car!”

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